Module 23: Making Changes After Publication

Objective
Video
Readings
Activity
Quiz
Discussion

Objectives

Having looked at the process of publishing an issue from the point of view of the various editorial team members, we’ll now look at making changes to an issue after publication, something only the editor is authorized to do.

The steps we’ll see in this lesson touch on a number of larger issues in editing a scholarly journal. To learn more about the four functions of a scholarly journal (functions which need to be considered when deciding to change a published issue), you may want to consult the course “Becoming an Editor.” That course also covers ethical issues like plagiarism and duplicate publication that would lead the editor to make changes.

Video

Readings

There are no readings for this lesson.

Activity

In this activity, imagine you received a call from the author of the submission you’ve recently been working with. He or she has found an error in the spelling of her last name. Can you figure out how you’d fix that? If you can’t find the answer, let me know and I’ll give you a hint!

Quiz

Start the quiz!

Discussion

This lesson has shown you how to make changes to an article after it has been published. Are there ever cases when you shouldn’t make changes to the article? Or that you should post a notice that a change has been made? What do you think?

One Comment on "Module 23: Making Changes After Publication"

  1. Profile photo of Greg Chan Greg Chan says:

    If the author wants to make a content-based tweak that wasn’t raised in the review or copyediting stages, then it is too late. I would say that a correction notice should be posted alongside the changed article, as it could affect the readers’ research and citations — and therefore the credibility of the journal itself.

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