Module 2: What’s in it for you?

Learning Objective
Introduction
Video
Readings
Activity

 

Learning Objective

In this module, you’ll learn some of the ways you will benefit from volunteering your time as a peer reviewer.

 

Introduction

In the previous module, we examined the critical nature of peer review for the advancement of science and scholarship. Despite its importance, however, peer review is rarely done for money and is primarily a volunteer effort. Reviewers are instead motivated by a range of non-financial incentives, including: increasing your knowledge of the latest work in your field, learning more about what good (and bad) writing looks like, developing relationships with others in your discipline, and providing an important addition to your CV. If that’s not enough, making an important contribution to your discipline should be another key motivation in your decision to get involved in the peer review process.

 

Video

In this video, Dr Elina Tuulikki Jaakkola, University of Turku, explains the benefits she gets from being a reviewer:

 

Readings

 

Activity

Can you think of any additional benefits to becoming a peer reviewer that are not mentioned here? Do you disagree or discount any of the benefits discussed? If so, which ones and why?

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2 Comments on "Module 2: What’s in it for you?"

  1. Peer review work helps me to know more about the recent development in my research areas.

  2. Profile photo of Venise Bryan Venise Bryan says:

    I agree with the benefits, but I also agree with the emerging view that reviewers and even authors should be paid for their contribution as some journals do charge for accessing articles

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